Something is happening at last

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Pitcher plant

Pitcher plant (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The 'Dentate' cultivar of the venus fly trap i...

The ‘Dentate’ cultivar of the venus fly trap in cultivation (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was kind of feeling sorry for myself on Wednesday morning, nothing to do, well nothing substantial to keep me occupied and I began wondering what the day might bring. Just after lunch I made the decision to do some baking but alas even that idea was thwarted at the starting gate, I was short of some of the ingredients. E would be going shopping the next day so I resigned myself to baking another day. In recent weeks E has obtained two small exotic plants neither of which are native to this country and one is doing fine but the other was suffering somewhat. The first is a pitcher plant which traps insects and digests them as they slip down inside the trumpet-shaped stems with no possibility of escape. The second plant is a Venus fly trap, its function is obvious from its name but alas that one was the one which was struggling. I searched the Internet for information and discovered we hadn’t first of all placed the plant in a favourable position and secondly were watering it with the wrong type of water. The plant needs lime-free water and rain water is ideal. We have two large water butts filled with rain water so that problem was solved. The plant doesn’t mind cool weather and in fact prefers a period of colder temperatures each year. We had the plant indoors where it is warm so we moved it into one of the greenhouses where the temperature at the moment is cooler. The plant also likes its roots in water as it gets its nutrients that way as well as by digesting flies! So we placed it on a flat slab of stone standing in a container filled with rain water which will only require refilling occasionally. All it needs now is for some small flies to find themselves inside the greenhouse. Hopefully the plant will survive and continue to grow. We were about to return indoors and I suggested we begin moving the pile of bricks, stones and rubble that we had stored on the large concrete base which is actually the continuation of the garage floor which projects beyond the rear wall and was never built upon. It is a convenient place to store things, too convenient in fact. We had to move it all so that scaffolding can be erected there. After fifteen minutes or so and only a quarter of the pile moved, the scaffolding company arrived and began to move the scaffolding on-site. They were to return the next day with more scaffolding and erect it all at both ends of the house so that we can arrange for the roof work to be done. The day wasn’t a wasted day after all and it looks as if things are beginning to happen at last.

Shirley Anne

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