Broken bones

Standard
English: X-ray shot of Trachemys scripta with ...

X-ray shot of Trachemys scripta with bone fracture of femur. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We are like broken bones and often we are in need of repair just as our bones would if they were indeed broken. Sometimes though the damage is so bad that we cannot see how repairs of any kind would help. We live broken lives and put up with it but there is hope, we are not left in that state forever as long as we believe it can change.
Shirley Anne

Tending Each Other’s Wounds (Hebrews 10:24–25)

The book of Hebrews was written to Christians who were facing persecution. Though evidently none of them had as yet been martyred because of their faith (see Hebrews 12:4), a number had been jailed or had their property confiscated (see Hebrews 10:34).
Most of the believers addressed in Hebrews had converted to Christianity from Judaism. Now, because of persecution, they were being pressured to return to Judaism. Some went along with the change, reasoning that the commandments and teachings of the Hebrew religion were the same as that of Christianity, but without Jesus.
The writer of Hebrews urged these believers to recognize that no faith is complete without Jesus. To turn away from Jesus is to cut out the very heart of Christianity.
Still, the threat of further persecution was real. Things would get very difficult for the believers. The writer of this letter responded to this threat by reminding his readers, first, that Jesus had endured hardships and persecution and therefore understood what they were going through. Jesus would provide them with divine assistance and encouragement, no matter how severe their suffering. Second, they could not make it on their own; they needed to help one another, precisely because of the tough times ahead.
That is good advice for spouses who need to encourage one another, particularly in times of crisis, such as financial hardship, relationship challenges, infertility issues or painful losses. No matter what happens or how severe our pain, the only way to triumph over trial is to be anchored in Christ and in each other.
Years ago, anthropologist Margaret Mead was asked by a student what she considered to be the first sign of civilization in a culture. The student expected Mead to talk about fishhooks or clay pots or grinding stones. But no. Mead said that the first sign of civilization in an ancient culture was a femur (thighbone) that had been broken and then healed.
Mead explained that in the animal kingdom, if you break your leg, you die. You cannot run from anger, get to the river for a drink or hunt for food. You are meat for prowling beasts. No animal survives a broken leg long enough for the bone to heal.
A broken femur that has healed is evidence that someone has taken time to stay with the one who fell, has bound up the wound, has carried the person to safety and has tended the person through recovery. Helping someone else through difficulty is where civilization starts, Mead said.
That sounds a lot like the gospel, doesn’t it? Jesus died for our sins when we were still sinners. He is our comfort and salvation when we are broken and dying. He is our lifeline in suffering. Now, as the writer of Hebrews said, we get to do the same for one another.
—Wayne Brouwer
Taken from NIV Couples’ Devotional Bible

Remember, no-one is unrepairable or unreachable where Christ Jesus is concerned…………

Shirley Anne

Advertisements

Comments are closed.