Category Archives: Domestic Projects

Ladders

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One thing I hate are ladders but only if they are in my stockings! The other variety though come in very handy don’t they? Years ago we purchased a two-section aluminium ladder, classed then as 27 feet (8.5 metres) and it has proved to be very useful because if required only one section need be used. We acquired another more robust aluminium two-section ladder that has a pulley attachment at the top, or rather that section which would be at the top when both sections are used. I say we acquired it because I have no idea from whence it came nor to whom it belonged. It may have been owned by E’s father, who lived in the house with us but who is now deceased. In any event no-one wants to claim it though we’ve asked them. I don’t really want it either but until I can find a way to dispose of it I am lumbered with it. I may end up taking it to the dump. Once I do that I can place one or two of my other ladders on the racks instead. One of those is presently stored on the rack which the grey coloured bicycle is hanging from (last picture) but it is out of sight in the picture.In the picture above you can see we have one section of it suspended near the ceiling in the garage on the right. There are empty builder’s material bags sitting on it at the moment. The heavier section I have hung on the wall on the opposite side of the garage together with our original ladder. We did not posses a rack on which to hang ladders so me being me decided I would make some. Now it has been a while since I worked much with metal insofar as bending and shaping it under heat like a blacksmith does. I have been trained in that discipline along with many other things so I am used to it but having all the equipment at home to carry out mechanical work is not what most women would regard as normal….LOL. I have a limited variety of tools and equipment but one of the most useful is a metal-working vice of a decent size on a workbench in the cellar. It has proved its worth over the years. I found some suitable mild steel metal bars in my stock of things and using a gas-torch to heat up the metal to straighten it and the shape it I made two brackets and fixed them to the garage wall…

You can see the ladders hanging on them. I also attached some sturdy chain to aid with supporting the ladders. Because the ladder we ‘acquired’ is quite heavy, one section being almost twice as heavy as the one we purchased, the brackets might bend under the strain without that extra support. The chains could be locked too should we require it. Sorry about the detail as I took the pictures as an afterthought but if you click on them they should magnify. That was my work for a couple of hours on Monday (11th). Speaking of stockings by the way, it is getting nearer that time of year when I resume wearing them….but without the ladders!

Shirley Anne

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Extra work

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After E’s nephew and his crew had finished their work on the garage roof alterations I finally got the opportunity to finish the electrical work on Friday morning. The task was to wire-in the new power outlet from the existing circuit in the garage but before I could do that I had to remove some now unnecessary lighting cabling and tidy up what remained. In the picture below all that work took place at ceiling height on the left above the ladders and scaffolding stored there and toward the door out of sight on the left. It would have taken far too long to shift everything to gain better access but the ladders and scaffolding were actually a benefit as I could climb them to reach the ceiling!

Once that was done I set about fitting a little extra support beneath one of the timbers. In the next picture it is the piece on the left flat against the wall at ceiling height. Let me explain. When the garage was built not all of the joists had been inserted into the house wall (the wall in the picture). Some had been supported by another joist which had been secured between two that went into the wall. It sounds complicated but in essence some of the joists could not be inserted in the wall where there is chimney stacks, and there are two of those along the length of the house wall.  

In the picture above two of the three joists had been inserted into the wall whilst the middle was supported by the timber lying flat on the wall. The left-hand joist of the two which were inserted into the wall had to be cut and removed.  It ran alongside the steel beam you can see top left. Now that short piece of timber on the wall was only secured to the outer timbers. Although the nails are intact and still in place the timber had been moved and it left a gap as you can see. My task was to fit a short length of timber to the wall beneath it thus giving more support (not shown in the picture).  It probably would be fine without it but I never take chances when it comes to structural integrity. At the opposite end of the now removed joist the crew had kindly left the hole unfilled. In the picture below it is immediately adjacent to the steel beam (top right).

It was awkward to get at and it needed much filling. I used a fine concrete mix and a brick. When bricklayers build double-thickness garden walls, which in fact the wall in the picture above is, they never bother to fill the gaps fully between the two bricks. Saving mortar I guess. The wall we reckon is as old as the house (1877). Later in the day I went to the top of the house to see E who was busy in her workshop  and I looked again at the roof…

…and noticed something that needs attention. In the picture above on the far side of the roof the top of the wall can be seen and it was capped with a layer of mortar when the garage roof had been constructed. Some of that mortar needs to be replaced, about one-third of it toward the front at the right-hand-side. When the weather permits I will do that work myself but I won’t be using just mortar, I will use a fine concrete mix instead, it is much stronger and less prone to cracking in the heat of the sun.

Shirley Anne

Mostly there and ready

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Once more I was unable to wire that power point in the garage due to the roof alteration work. I awoke at four-forty and though I had set the alarm for an hour later I decided to get up. I had planned an early morning walk anyway so a little earlier made no difference. The guys were due to arrive at eight so I moved the van on to the driveway and out of their way. I opened the gates in readiness so they could reverse their van onto the drive when they arrived. I had given them one of the remote control units so they could simply get on with the work without having to announce their arrival. I did that in case I hadn’t returned from my walk before they arrived. E would still be asleep and I didn’t wish her to be disturbed. Unfortunately things didn’t go exactly to plan. The guys arrived before eight and the boss ten minutes later. They rang the doorbell! E told me later that she had heard it, oh well. They immediately went to work and carried out the changes I had insisted upon having seen their first attempt. I need not have worried as, according to them, the previous attempt was a temporary affair. I gave them the benefit of my doubts.

You can see the roof between the end joist and the steel beam is now higher than the rest of the roof. You can also see a sheet of thin plywood has been affixed to the surface of the last joist which secures the added timber that has been fitted on top of it. The joist which sat against the steel beam was removed and new timber was fixed at a higher position. In fact you can see the hole at top right in the lower picture. I will fill that as soon as I can, though I don’t know why the builders didn’t do it! I could have insisted I suppose but I have the materials to hand and it will give me something extra to do anyway. Just after lunch they began to seal the roof using fibre glass and resin in preference to the existing felt (bitumen sheeting). Evidently it is superior but only time will tell..

There is now plenty of header space in which to install the new roller door and at last I can finish the electrical work. Had I the time in the afternoon I may have done so on the day but I was too busy tidying up!

Shirley Anne

Out of the window

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After breakfast on Wednesday morning I drove to the electrical supplier and purchased ten metres of cable with which to wire the new power outlet in the garage. I discovered my stock had diminished to zero for that size of cable but that didn’t matter as these days I have little use for what remains of my stock since I retired earlier this year. If I need something I don’t have in stock it can be purchased as required. The cost for the cable? £6.66….Mmm…a little ominous I thought, that number being the mark of the beast (Scripture). Anyway on my return home it was eleven o’clock and I wanted a drink of coffee before starting any work. I called to E to ask if she would like a coffee too but she was drying her hair and wouldn’t be downstairs for another ten minutes. I waited until she came downstairs before making the coffee. Just then she received a call from her nephew who wanted to ask us which of the two options we wanted in the alterations and repairs to the garage roof before the installation of the new roller shutter door in a couple of weeks. The first option, the cheapest, wasn’t what we wanted so we chose the second option which met our requirements. It would cost us £550 but that didn’t matter as much as getting it right. E sent him a text message and he called back asking if he could start the work straight away otherwise we would have to wait a couple of weeks because of his schedule. We agreed he and his crew could come immediately. That meant I couldn’t do the work I had intended to do because I would be in their way and they in mine. My work could wait as it would only take an hour or so and there was plenty of time before it had to be finished. That left me a little high and dry to have my plans fly out of the window with nothing else to do. I find it difficult to do my own thing when there are others working in or around my house because I cannot concentrate in case they require something or information that only I can provide. The work couldn’t be completed in the few hours they were here so they planned to arrive early the next morning to hopefully finish the work before noon and especially before it might rain.

Shirley Anne

I did and…

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In contrast to yesterday’s post I said I would get on with the electrical work and I did. It was a slow start for me on Tuesday as I began the work at ten-thirty. There were several things I had to do before I could make any progress on diverting the supply to the existing power outlets in the garage. This garage we erected in 1989 about a year after we had moved in, maybe less, and the wiring for a light and a twin power outlet was taken from the basement house wiring. I rewired the house in 1988/9. Different electrical regulations were in force at that time so the wiring was compliant to those regulations. Since those days the garage supply, though still wired the same way, was brought under the protection of circuit breakers and RCD units by myself. Added to that I had installed two outdoor electrical supplies each fed from a dedicated RCD unit and circuit breakers. One was fitted in the boiler room and the other was installed in the other garage. The board provides the supply for that garage and for the other circuits at that end of the garden, the patio for instance. The unit in the boiler room supplies a couple of power outlets and some lights at the opposite end of the garden behind the first garage. For a time I connected the power outlets in the first garage (the one in which my van is parked and the subject of this post) to the same RCD unit. Today, Tuesday as I write this, I have removed the supply to the outlets and re-supplied them from one of the house distribution boards instead as there was a spare circuit breaker I could dedicate for them. Ideally I could have installed a small RCD board we call here a ‘garage unit’ in the garage itself but because there is the same protection wiring it the way I have I chose not to use one. It would be an unnecessary expenditure. Most of the electrical work was therefore carried out in the cellar (basement) rooms as I had to run a cable to the main supply units through those rooms. Having done that work I ran out of cable to actually wire for a new outlet near to the garage door. I would have to do that small job another day, probably Wednesday after I purchase the cable. This is the board I fitted before doing the rest of the work….

The lighting switch was originally directly on the brick wall. The new power outlet beneath it is the new one waiting to be wired into the existing circuit. I had to do a lot of cleaning and clearing out of rubbish as well as moving some things to the other end of the garage in readiness for the new door to be installed in a couple of weeks time. Here are some pics of the existing door mechanisms. The motor in the top picture pulls a loop of chain similar to those on bicycles which is attached to the top of the door..

The tracks in which the doors wheels run can be seen with the huge springs and their pullies above them. Click on pictures to magnify. The ladder in the last picture has been there for many years and has never been used. It was left by someone but nobody can remember who! It could be used but we have other ladders which are in better condition. You can see in the last picture the old garage door post with the cream-coloured painted top which was left as am extra support for the wall when the garage was constructed around it.

Shirley Anne

 

A little drained

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I’d a good night’s sleep on Thursday but arose still feeling a little tired. We were forecast to have a few showers during the morning but as it was still dry around ten o’clock I thought I might see if I could do something about the drain pipe connected to the water butt. The pipe allows excess rain water to flow to the main drain at the side of the house once the water butt is full to the brim. However, since constructing the stone bench it was now in the way as I intend to fit a back rest on the wall behind it.

We have at home a lot of plumbing materials including left-over pipes and recovered pipes from previous works and I was wondering if there was enough pipes and fittings of the right size to use to re-position  the drain pipe. After a search I finally found what I needed except for some fixing brackets which I will have to purchase next time I am out from the house. At least the system can remain in use in the meantime I have had to place a couple of bricks beneath the pipe to support it.

No sooner had I packed away the tools and it began to rain heavily. I checked the grid into which the piped water flows and it was pouring out as it should. By now it was approaching noon and E and I sat down with a drink, chatted and watched some television until it was time to eat. A few days earlier she had asked me to help fit some shelving in the room we transformed into her workshop early last year but I had forgotten until I began thinking about projects at lunch. After lunch therefore we both went upstairs to see what could be done. When I stripped out the room to refurbish it I removed some shelving and brackets and had stored them away. It was easy enough for us to refit once she had decided what she wanted. 

More shelves can be added by simply fitting extra brackets into the supports. All in a day’s work as they say.

Shirley Anne

Bank holiday?

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Monday (28th) here in the UK was one of those days we call a Bank Holiday, traditionally a day when bank employees took a break from, well banking. Banks closed for the day and therefore it limited trading activities. Nowadays banking takes place on-line for the most part but the holiday remains in place for everyone to enjoy or not as they wish. Today the holiday is referred to as the August Bank Holiday, there are others. Anyway it never made much difference to me when I became self-employed back in 1997. I would work if the opportunity presented itself, and it often did. The day still makes little difference to me now that I am retired, well retired from electrical work in a full or part-time capacity. I find work to do at home which pretty much keeps me active. I am not alone in being one that works over the holiday, I know many people do the same and if you go down any high street it is business as usual for many. As I said, banking is carried out over The Internet and much commerce follows suit. The Country can’t close down for the day can it? We were expecting someone to visit the house at my request to assess some work I want carrying out. I have decided to replace the garage doors on the garage I use to park my van. This one…

From the picture it looks fine and indeed the door itself is fine even though it is around twenty-eight years old. That is because it is made of fibreglass and aluminium. However it had always been opened and closed manually until a couple of years ago when I had it converted to electrical operation.Now again, there is nothing wrong with that set-up either but what is a problem are the mechanical components that had to remain after the conversion. They comprise the two side tracks in which the door runs, the wheels which run inside the tracks, the two large heavy-duty springs one each side which assist in the raising of the door, the pulleys and the steel wires either side which form part of the spring mechanism. All of these, especially the steel wires which need replacing regularly, require constant maintenance and of course that involves cost! It was high-time I replaced the door with a roller-shutter variety similar to what we had installed in the other garage though more streamlined.

That roller door is more like an industrial type than a domestic one though it doesn’t appear anything like that to look at it. It is a very efficient door and very robust. So the guy came along to measure the opening and requirements as did E’s nephew, a builder who was at hand to discuss any alterations that might have to be undertaken before the installation takes place. I agreed on a price for the work (£2250) which hopefully will take place in around a month’s time. As it is a bespoke unit it will take time to manufacture. Unfortunately as the opening is non-standard a door from their stock cannot be used. I paid the £600 requested up-front now all I have to do is raise the balance and carry out some electrical alterations for the installation.

Shirley Anne

Saying and doing

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How many of you say you’ll do something but don’t do it? I am sometimes guilty of this or have been in the past. I get ideas, think them through then decide if I will do them or not. I am more likely to do things these days than leave them to one side. E tells me that my problem is thinking up too many projects, no sooner have I completed one she says then I am thinking of another. I guess she is right but as I said to her I like to take breaks between them! It has been a few days since I completed my last project, the garden gate and the brick pillar though I’ve still at the time of writing this yet to cement on the capstone. That will probably be done soon however. On Thursday morning we were discussing unfulfilled projects, only unfulfilled because of other things getting in the way and now with nothing to prevent them being done. First off having discovered we could not purchase locally we placed an order on-line for a sturdy washing line pole. I will be installing it in a new position from an existing one. Next, we ordered two outdoor wall lighting units to replace the bulkhead fittings I installed over the patio some years ago but never really liked. I kept saying I would change them but never got around to actually doing it. Now I have no excuse as by the time you are reading this they should be here. I have to build two small pillars in brick to support a slab of natural stone for it to become a stone bench seat set in the ‘Plot’ behind one of the garages. See posts written twelve months ago regarding the Plot. We are thinking of referring to the Plot as the secret garden in future as it is now hidden from the main garden by the new gate. Anyway one of the other things we wanted to do was to fall a Mountain Ash (Rowan) tree which had developed a problem and had begun to die off. You can see the base of the trunk in the picture below, it is on the extreme right-hand side. As you can see the trunk begins to lean further to the right and ends up six metres high and hanging over the garden wall about a metre and a half to the right in this picture taken a couple of years ago.Whilst E was out doing the weekly shopping on Thursday I set about felling it. It stood in the Mound at the rear and was pretty much hidden by the damson trees growing there and it was leaning toward the garden next door anyway. It took me about thirty minutes to cut it down and cut up the branches and a further fifteen minutes to chop down what was left of the main trunk with an axe. The stump still remains so that is another job for the future. Incidentally, the tree stump in the front garden is still stubbornly refusing to go though I have been making progress on doing that, slow progress that is! So there are plenty of things to do outdoors to keep me occupied and that is besides the garden maintenance.

Shirley Anne

More blind men?

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The mistakes are there, you just don’t see them. I cannot say with hand on heart that anything I do is perfect, nobody can but hey, I think I get pretty close sometimes. Well I think so. Good intentions are sometimes pushed aside once work progresses and unforeseen problems occur.It is all about just getting on with it and tackling problems as they surface. It is either that or don’t do the work yourself. For me, I am used to it all and half-times expect a rough ride now and then. It is satisfying nevertheless to be able to do things for myself despite the difficulties along the way. On Friday and Saturday last week I constructed the gate for the latest project and fitted it on Saturday morning. Here is the finished article…(click on images to magnify)

The rear view (top picture) shows a diagonal piece of timber at the top which isn’t a match for the rest of the wood. It was simply that I had used all the timber I had bought to construct the gate so had to use something from my stock. The timber is sold in four-metre lengths and I wasn’t about to buy that much just for the short length needed. I had intended to use timber from my stock for the whole project but found I hadn’t enough which is why I purchased new. I don’t know about blind men on galloping horses but it looks alright to me! Now I am planning my next project……

Shirley Anne

Carpentry and stuff

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I have always enjoyed working with wood, it is one of those materials which is easy to work with though it is unforgiving, make a mistake and it isn’t easily undone. I have made a few mistakes in the past when working with wood as I am sure many have but it is a rewarding experience making things in wood. My latest little project is manufacturing a wooden gate and installing it at the side of the house. My readers will by now have seen my progress with the brickwork if they’ve followed my recent posts. On Thursday (10 th) I began working with the wood and my first task was to cut and fit the two wooden posts for each side of the gate opening…..

The one on the right has to support the gate itself so I used large ‘Rawlbolts’  to secure it to the brick wall. Here is a picture of a rawlbolt for anyone who doesn’t know what they are,,,

As the bolt is tightened it draws the nut (on the right-hand end) into the body which expands inside the hole in which it is fitted. The bolt obviously passes through the timber first! The post on the left has no weight to carry and therefore I used long screws instead. I must remember to clean off the dried mortar on the wall on the right where I had been filling in some holes after installing the posts.The posts themselves do not stand directly on the ground so that they will resist rotting  when it rains. Wood standing on the ground will soak up water and eventually get wet rot. The timber was purchased pre-treated against the weather but I have given it more coats of weather resisting treatment too. After lunch I began work on constructing the gate itself and got this far with it before stopping for the day at five o’clock….

I have it standing in the garage as I write this. There is more work to do on it yet before I hang it in position though. Hopefully I can finish the work soon, it all depends upon other things, not least of all the weather.

Shirley Anne

The day after…

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The Reluctant Dragon (film)

The Reluctant Dragon (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It was Tuesday morning and I had just awoken. I felt a little reluctant to go for a walk but thought I would do anyway knowing full well that I would enjoy it. However before I was even dressed I received a call from a lady asking if I could check a power outlet for her. As it was reasonably close by and a simple job I agreed to do it, though after getting dressed and having my breakfast. An hour later I was at the house and soon had the job done. On my return home I left the van on the driveway for I had decided to take a trip to the timber and builder’s merchant to purchase timber for the gate I am constructing. I found that the timber I had at home was unsuitable and of insufficient quantity anyway. Starting from scratch with pre-treated (against the weather) timber was a better option though I intended to purchase some coloured wood preserver to give it an extra coat when the work is finished. First of all though I had to take measurements so went into the house and then into the garden to do so. Off I went to the depot a mile down the road and found a young man in the yard where the timber is stored. Having selected what I needed he cut some of the timber into two pieces so that I could transport it home on the roof rack of the van. The money I had just earned more than covered the cost of the materials and my purse was more or less left intact! I have noticed that happening quite often lately since my ‘official’ retirement. It was approaching lunchtime on my return home. I removed the timber from the van and stored it ready for use on another day. I wasn’t going to make a start so near lunch time and afterward I probably wouldn’t be in the mood anyway. E had been informed that her mom had been discharged from the hospital as I mentioned in yesterday’s post. E was telling me how reluctant she had been to go and how much of a struggle the paramedics had getting her in the ambulance the previous day as she had fought tooth and nail resisting their efforts. Obviously they had persuaded her to go and be checked out. She confesses to not liking hospitals for fear of the possibility of dying there one day. I suppose many old folk think that way because they would prefer to pass away quietly at home. E drove off to see her later in the afternoon but I stayed at home watching the rain pouring down as promised.

Shirley Anne

Blind man

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You must have heard the expression but if not….’A blind man on a galloping horse, won’t notice’……well that can’t be anything else but true, if you could have blind men riding horses at such a pace! It’s an expression used when excuses for something we have done is not appearing quite right. I didn’t go for a walk on Friday because I wanted to press on with building the column for the proposed gate I want to make. I didn’t wish to be tired from walking whilst knowing I had the work to do during a dry spell in the weather. I began the work at ten o’clock and was finished as far as I could go before twelve-thirty. I completed the column but have yet to fit a capstone. The capstone you see in the pictures is twisted and isn’t cemented to the column. I have never seen a piece of twisted capstone before but yes this piece is definitely twisted. It is also too long. I shall have to purchase another…

Anyway E came to inspect the finished work but before she could say anything I quipped ‘A blind man on a galloping horse won’t notice’. Well it looks alright but it isn’t perfect, just near enough! I could have said it is perfect as long as you don’t look at it or anyone living in Australia can’t see it. Actually it isn’t that bad at all. My next task, apart from buying a capstone is to begin manufacturing a gate, hopefully from timber I have in stock. It may be a while before that job is done but there’s no hurry. After lunch E and I sat out in the sunshine though it was still quite windy. Later I took a few minutes to mow the lawn whilst I had the chance, we were expecting some rain. I did however water the garden just in case it didn’t rain.

Shirley Anne

Felt like twice

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Up early on a wet and windy August Thursday morning ready to venture out for a walk. One banana later I was outside in the weather. Though it was wet and windy it was warm, though when in the wind it felt that much cooler. I ate breakfast on my return home because it was still early enough to do that. On some occasions I skip breakfast if I am late getting back home and have an early lunch instead. E was still sitting at the breakfast table when I returned. She seldom asks how far I walked but I usually tell her anyway. It had been a short walk of just over four miles but it felt as if I had walked twice the distance because of the wind. On the outward journey I had taken a more sheltered route in the built-up areas through the town but on my return leg I walked along the promenade which is totally exposed to the west. The wind was blowing from the south-west and therefore directly in my face. I could have taken the coastal road instead as it would have made little difference. Between the promenade and the coastal road a quarter-mile away there is almost nothing of height, lake and gardens is all. I shudder to think what it would have been like for anyone out running but there weren’t any runners to be seen. Fair weather runners? I think not for I never used to deliberately run in the wind in exposed places either. I had work to do in the afternoon and the weather was to change by then, that is it would stop raining. I have been building the column for the gate at the side of the house in the rear garden and the weather has been fine whilst doing it. This is how far I got with it the day before…(centre in both pictures)

I gave up on the idea of working on the column in the afternoon for two reasons, one I was feeling tired and two it was still very windy though the rain had stopped. At the side of the house where the work is being carried out it was very windy indeed with gusts of around 35 mph, far too uncomfortable to be working in especially as there is no hurry to finish the job. Hopefully though by the time you read this it will be completed.

Shirley Anne

Getting further

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English: Bricks in a wall.

: Bricks in a wall. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was up and out reasonably early on Tuesday (1st) for my walk. The previous day saw me taking a backward route before continuing in my usual direction. It has the effect of adding an extra half-mile to any distance I might travel on my walk. Southport is an easy place to plan a long walk especially if you like walking along the coastal roads. However, Southport can be a windy place too and for that reason. For myself it is ideal as I like the refreshing and invigorating breeze when out walking. When I am not out walking I detest the wind! Is that strange do you think? Maybe not. Sitting on the patio is spoiled when the wind is too high. Anyway my walk ended up longer than I had imagined it would and it gets easier each time I go out but I know this from my experiences when running. Any exercise gets easier the more it is done. When I arrived back home it was almost noon and as I had little to eat before the walk I was hungry. After lunch E had to take her mom into town to do some shopping and I took the opportunity to lay a few bricks. ‘Few’ being the operative word as I didn’t wish to rush into it. I am building the column for the gate I plan to fit later. I decided to mix the mortar by hand in a large plastic bucket rather than use the mixer as getting out the mixer for such a small amount wasn’t worth the effort. In fact I have decided not to use the mixer at all as I build. The mixer has been a boon during the time we have had it because the projects I had undertaken required a lot of mortar. This column will use far less each time I add a course of bricks and will serve to slow the process down. There is no urgency to get the work done quickly as I have all the time in the world and can take things slowly. Normally a job like this would take me two days, not because I couldn’t lay the amount of bricks in a day to complete the column but because only a few courses can be laid each time. Too many courses being laid will result in the mortar being squeezed out between the lower courses and the structure may not hold its shape whilst the mortar sets. Sounds like a good excuse but in fact is true.

Shirley Anne

Didn’t take me long

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Skills Like This

Skills Like This (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I have been on the go for most of my life, always looking for something to do but it has to be something I like doing. My electrical career has been a fascinating experience, never a dull moment and often the work was varied, no two jobs the same. Not only that but I became conversant and experienced in many electrical disciplines as well as in other closely related fields. To put it simply it was enjoyable and held my interest, it still does though I have far less involvement now. This means I have to find other things to occupy my time and again they have to be something I like doing. Over the years I have developed skills in building work and other skills such as plumbing, joinery and so on. This has proven to be beneficial for most of the work around the house I can do myself and save vast amounts of cash in the process by not having to employ someone else. So it helps that I like working with my hands and it gives me great satisfaction whenever I complete a project or small task that needs doing. I have (so far) this summer been enjoying more time to myself and have found the freedom to do what I like when it pleases me very liberating. However I am always thing of things to do so that I never get bored and have recently decided on starting a couple of outdoor projects to that end. Once I get an idea it plays upon my mind until at last I get the ball rolling. I needed more sand and cement and also gate furniture for when I make the gate I have in mind to construct later. First though I have to build a column constructed of bricks, hence the reason for acquiring some. E’s nephew, a builder, has graciously allowed us to take whatever bricks we wanted from his stock. We took 45 and he asked if we wanted more as he wanted to get rid of them. We said we would accept 50 more and he delivered them on Monday morning last week. That was the motivation I needed to go and purchase the sand, cement and the rest. Now, as I write this, I have no excuses to prevent me beginning some of the work………..it just depends upon the weather. I would like to try to make the work last as long as I can but I have a feeling that will never happen!

Shirley Anne