Category Archives: Wildlife

So far so good

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It is December 2 as I write this. It is Saturday afternoon and I have just eaten lunch. Actually lunch served as two meals for I haven’t eaten breakfast. Over the last few days the weather has been cold with a northerly biting wind blowing off the sea along the coast where I live. Today all of that changed and it has been warmer and far less windy. Although the temperature is barely reaching 9 deg C it has been pleasant in the sunshine, well this morning anyway for at this very moment the sun is about to set and the day has turned cloudy. I went for a walk along the seashore to a point some three miles or more away before turning inland to take an elevated  footpath across the marshland. The path is a historical ‘right of way‘ passage which cuts through one of the local golf courses of which there are many around here. The area is called ‘Marshside’ for very obvious reasons, it is basically marshland or wet land where many wildfowl visit. Having traversed to the other side of the area the path led out to a road which I have often walked on my travels to and from the seafront. There was an old sign showing the site where an old airfield was located many years ago. There was a workshop at the location from 1910 until 1966 according to the sign……….This is the exit point onto Hesketh Road from which I emerged. 

More information here…….http://www.forgottenairfields.com/united-kingdom/england/merseyside/hesketh-park-aerodrome-s1249.html

Facing the row of houses I turned right which took me back to the shore. I remained on the concrete on my walk back home having walked on the shore on the outward trek. What is the collective term for a large group of people dressed in waterproof clothing carrying tripods and binoculars? No I don’t know either but there was such a group descended on the footpath in front of me eagerly pointing their binoculars out to sea across the marshes. One thing you can say about this part of the coast is we have plenty of geese, ducks, swans, gannets and gulls and many more varieties of birds for bird watchers, which is what this group were doing. Just a couple of miles further inland there is a wetland centre for all those interested in birds. It is called Martin Mere…. https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/martin-mere/  . So that was my day on Saturday. As we approach the Winter Solstice we can begin to look forward to warmer times ahead but we’ve got some cold weather yet to come first no doubt. In the meantime so far so good.

Shirley Anne

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I gave in

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We had another bright and sunny day on Thursday but it was bitterly cold outside with an offshore wind making it feel that much colder. Despite the weather I got myself ready to take a walk, yes, you guessed it, down toward the beach. Brave as I am as far as the cold weather is concerned even I had to admit to feeling uncomfortable as I plodded along through the sand dunes trying to steer clear of the biting wind. All along the coast hereabouts we have sand lizards and Natterjack toads (  http://www.countryfile.com/days-out/natterjack-toads-southport-lancashire  ) both of which are protected species. In among the dunes there are areas called ‘slacks’, wet places, as well as large ponds which are dotted between the dunes. These are the breeding grounds for the toads, not that I saw any toads of course as they would be hibernating out of sight until Spring. The lizards are even more inconspicuous, even in Summer. As I walked along I noticed the surface of the ponds were partly frozen in places showing just how cold it really was. The air temperature at that time was around 3 or 4 deg C but the wind-chill factor made it feel nearer zero. The ground is often frosty at this time of year despite the higher air temperature. Although there was some shelter from the wind it nevertheless made its presence felt. I walked perhaps a mile in total through the dunes and decided it was too cold there so I moved away from the shore to more sheltered places. I don’t usually feel the effects of the cold weather when I am wrapped up in suitable clothing and although I wear a skirt my legs never seem to feel cold. I wear thick knee-length stockings which I let drop to my ankles and my walking boots and it is enough. However my hands can get cold even though I may be wearing fleece-lined gloves. The main problem is the wind. If it isn’t windy, which is very rare in Southport, the coldness is less noticeable. I might have been a little tired on Thursday morning but I cut my walk short and returned home after only an hour.

Shirley Anne

Surveying the land

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English: did you know that squirrels like beer...

Did you know that squirrels like beer? I did not know that. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Usually a term used to describe (in the dictionary – as a noun) ‘an act or instance of surveying or of taking a comprehensive view of something’. I am applying it in reference to my amble around my garden: amble: a verb – ‘to go at a slow, easy pace; stroll; saunter’, something I do quite often in the gardens throughout the year. I’ve grown to love and appreciate my gardens in the last few years whilst reflecting upon all the work I have done to get them to where they are now. My little surveys reveal the things I need to do to keep on top of things. Currently my thoughts are centred around spotting bluebells which have escaped my notice especially in the areas in which I have been working to remove them but also in other places they might appear. It was late on Saturday morning when I took a stroll along the path by the greenhouses and the first thing I noticed was a bluebell growing in the patch in front of the small greenhouse. I fetched the small garden fork and dug it out. Then I saw another and some more in the same general area. I have been expecting more to show as the weather gets warmer and I’ve not been disappointed! Having dug about thirty and removed them I thought that would be the end of it but no, there were some growing in the small plot nearby too. I removed them. I checked over the whole flowerbeds by the greenhouses to make sure I had removed all that had shown themselves. I spent a little time digging out a few more bluebells in the unfinished part of the corner plot where I have been working recently. I went indoors to prepare a meal. It was around three o’clock when I decided to take another amble around the garden and my keen eyes spotted a couple of bluebells in the flowerbed by the patio. I didn’t take any immediate action but noted where they were for the next time I would be working in the garden. I hadn’t much intention to work in the garden on the day because I wanted a rest from it and the weather forecast had been for rain anyway, though it didn’t rain until much later in the day. I spent a little time filling the seed dispenser for the birds as E seems to have forgotten to do it. On Friday morning I saw the strangest thing when looking out of the window into the rear garden. I saw ‘our’ little grey squirrel running along the top of the garden wall holding a slice of bread in its mouth! I never knew squirrels liked bread (and beer apparently) but I guess they will eat anything if hungry. We had been putting out nuts for them but hadn’t seen much of the squirrels lately due to the cold weather. Anyway the squirrel was being pursued by a jay who wanted a piece of the action but the squirrel was having none of it and kept out of the bird’s way. Funny what you see in the garden if you take the time to look.

Shirley Anne  

Rain at last

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Palm trees of unknown species. Identification ...

Palm trees of unknown species. Identification is appreciated. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For quite some time now we have had dry and sunny weather which has obviously been welcomed but there comes a time when we need rain. Now for once I could leave the hose reel in storage and not have to water the garden plants as we got that rain on Monday morning and again later in the evening with more promised during the week. Autumn is here, my favourite time of year. After a more restful weekend I was happy to get a request for work but it wasn’t much, though it paid well. More followed during the week, enough to keep me happy. There will be plenty to do at home, in the gardens, clearing away fallen leaves, pruning back overgrowth of trees and shrubs. We are hoping the wall we demolished might get re-built within the next few weeks but of course that will require we get a couple of dry days to have it done. E and I have been watching and feeding the squirrels as one or two of them have been busy scurrying about on the wall, in the garden and through the tree branches. No doubt they have been searching for food and storing it away. There will be less sitting out on the patio as the temperature drops away though at this moment we are still enjoying temperatures of 17 C or 18 C during the day. It won’t last though and it won’t be long before I will have to wrap the palm trees with some plastic sheets to protect them from icy winds. We have some large sheets of plastic bubble-wrap ready for when it is required. The plants can withstand below freezing temperatures up to a point but the cold wind burns the leaves and it is the wind which needs shielding against. For the time being is it just getting cooler and wetter but not enough to prevent working outside.

Shirley Anne

Our regulars and those we don’t see often

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Great Tit in a back garden near Tetbury, Glouc...

Great Tit in a back garden near Tetbury, Gloucestershire.

E and I took a little time out from the work in the garden and we were in the greenhouse potting about. E drew my attention to a little Robin struggling to carry off an enormous worm it had discovered on the wet grass where E had hosed a dew minutes earlier. After a couple of attempts the bird gave up and flew off only to return to sit in the apple tree searching for small insects. We see this little Robin nearly every day and he (or it might be a she) is soon on the ground behind us if we have been digging in the soil as we did a few days ago removing stones and weeds in the corner of the garden. That work has yet to be finished. Other regular visitors are the Great Tits, Wrens, Blackbirds and a couple of Sparrows which have been seemingly rare these days. Larger birds come and go like the Jays, Wood Pigeons and Magpies and there will always be the Gulls, especially if we put out large pieces of bread. They seem to know just where there are easy pickings. We hear and have seen the local Woodpecker and Barn Owls too. Sometimes we find a dead bird on the lawn, taken by one of the neighbourhood cats but never eaten, just ripped apart probably whilst they were foraging for food early in the morning. The sneaky cat must be hiding in the bushes waiting for some unsuspecting bird to hop into view. At this time of year if we go into the garden at dusk we can often see bats flying about after moths or other insects that might still be airborne. We don’t get other animals or birds in the rear garden because of the height of the walls but it is possible that a fox might make the attempt. We have seen foxes in our next-door neighbour’s garden but access there is easier than ours is. In one way that is to our benefit for security reasons but it does restrict any desirable visitors we might like to have.

Shirley Anne